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Mary Louise Kelly

Is it possible to write a coming of age novel when your main character is 39 years old? Jami Attenberg attempts just that in her new novel All Grown Up.

Protagonist Andrea Bern is about to turn 40 — she lives in Brooklyn, working as a graphic designer in advertising. She's a failed artist, and she's trying to figure out a path to happiness.

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Edward Price joined the CIA in 2006 and thought he would work there forever.

Instead, he drove out of CIA headquarters on Feb. 14 after signing his resignation letter.

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It was Donald Trump's first solo press conference as president yesterday, and it was pretty extraordinary. He took questions for more than an hour. But this is really the message he was trying to get across.

(SOUNDBITE OF PRESS CONFERENCE)

Updated at 5:10 p.m. ET

Call it the case of the mysterious moving confirmation hearing.

Donald Trump nominated Dan Coats to the nation's top intelligence post back on Jan. 7, when Trump was still president-elect and Coats — an Indiana Republican — had just departed the Senate.

But today — nearly four weeks into the Trump administration — there's still no firm date on the calendar for the Senate confirmation hearing for the director of national intelligence nominee.

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Here's one side of the resume of the CIA's new second-in-command, Gina Haspel: she's a decorated officer, serving more than three decades undercover, including multiple tours as a station chief.

And here's another side: Haspel's fingerprints are all over the CIA's detention and interrogation programs. She ran the "black site" prison in Thailand where al-Qaida suspect Abu Zabaydah was waterboarded 83 times. Those sessions were videotaped but the tapes were destroyed in 2005, two years after a member of Congress called on the CIA to preserve such tapes.

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