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Lalo Schifrin On Piano Jazz

22 hours ago

Composer, arranger and pianist Lalo Schifrin trained classically as a young man in Argentina. He went on to study at the Paris Conservatory as he developed a career as a jazz musician and began playing and recording in Europe. He has written more than 100 film and television scores and has won multiple Grammy and Academy Award nominations.

Members of the Philly punk scene and from across the country have come together for Don't Stop Now, a compilation of covers that benefits the American Civil Liberties Union. It was released today via Bandcamp, with this note:

This compilation is an expression of love, anger, hope and protest on inauguration day. Let it serve as a reminder that the fight for justice is not over, that the celebration of diversity is essential to progress, that we must work together for what is fair and good. Can't stop. Won't Stop. Don't stop now.

Love songs can often feel myopic. Sometimes it's to their benefit: When done with a certain emotional depth, lyrical particularity can take on a universal quality. It's as simple as someone telling a story that evokes an intimate memory in someone else. That's one of the many reasons why love (and subsequent heartache) is the most popular songwriting topic of all, but also the most exhaustive — and exhausting.

"Our best musicians in the jazz tradition were radical imaginers," Samora Pinderhughes says. A pianist and composer in his mid-20s, he has asserted his connection to that lineage with The Transformations Suite, an earnest and ambitious new work combining music, words and visuals. The piece, which took five years to chisel into shape, was inspired by African-American resistance and protest movements, as well as the oppression that many still endure.

Amid social and political upheaval, it's only natural to seek out interpreters who use screams, brush strokes and dance to articulate the intangible. It's only natural that art responds in kind to its environment and the hostilities it faces. It's only natural, if flippant and ignorant and unfair, to think that punk only thrives under such circumstances, as if musicians prefer oppression to freedom.

Hints have been trickling out since late in 2016, but the official word is here: The latest album from Dirty Projectors is self-titled and due out Feb. 24 on Domino Records.

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